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Carey is a die-hard Yankees fan, lover of music and hockey, and has learned how to live life to the fullest despite MS.

Carey was diagnosed with MS (multiple sclerosis) in 1998 at age 41. Up until 2012, MS had a minimal effect on Carey’s life. As the disease began to progress, Carey started having trouble walking, his speech slurred and he lost a lot of his short-term memory.

Forced into an early retirement in 2012 because of his physical limitations, Carey had to find new ways to fill his days. “Retirement has not been what I imagined but I try to keep myself busy,” said Carey.

At 61, Carey spends his time doing as much as his body will allow. “I read a lot, cruise the internet, watch movies and do puzzles. There is a lot I can’t do but I try to make the best of it,” said Carey.

Prior to the progression of MS, Carey was very active. He coached baseball for 17 years, was on a bowling team and loved to go to concerts – he has a shoebox filled with ticket stubs and programs. “It was really hard having to give up my independence and ability to coach baseball and do things like drive a car,” said Carey. “I cried the day I had to sell my car and hand over the keys.”

Carey turned to the clinical professionals at Mount Sinai Hospital for alternative ways to stay mobile and active. It was there that he met Numotion ATP, Brian. “Brian is the greatest,” said Carey. “When I had to get my first power wheelchair in 2017, he was patient with me. He came out to my house and explained all the ins and outs of the chair. He is there when I need anything.”

Carey’s new power chair allows him to get out of the house and makes things a lot easier for him and his wife. “I am more mobile with my new chair,” said Carey. “I can go down the street and out to dinner with my wife. MS is the card I was dealt, so I try to stay positive.”Carey is a die-hard Yankees fan, lover of music and hockey, and has learned how to live life to the fullest despite MS.