Numotion's COVID-19 Response: What you Need to Know

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Being disabled and traveling in a wheelchair brings unique challenges. But as an adaptive sports athlete traveling with two wheelchairs and baggage can be very complicated and challenging. Given that I only have two hands and need both to push my chair, I have had to develop clever solutions for this situation.
 
  1. I have found that placing the large bag on top of my sports wheelchair acts as a perfect carrier for my bag. I put my backpack on the backrest of my everyday chair, which perfectly holds the backpack. Then I push my everyday chair with one hand while holding and pushing with my other hand on the back of my sports chair.
  2. Don’t check your sports chair as baggage at the airport. Keep it and push it to the gate. Too many times, my sports chair has been lost or damaged by the airlines. No chair for me means I can’t compete.
  3. The sports chair is a perfect holder for any baggage or carry-on luggage. Meaning you only have the chairs to push but no extra weight to have to carry.
 
Happy travels, everyone!
 
Josh Turek, Specialty Account Manager

Author

Josh Turek, Specialty Account Manager

Josh Turek was born with Spina Bifida and is a lifelong manual wheelchair user and a lifelong participant and advocate for adaptive sports. Josh is a gold medalist and 3x Paralympian in wheelchair basketball. He has played professional wheelchair basketball 15 years in several countries. Josh has represented the USA in 3 Paralympic Games in wheelchair basketball, winning a gold medal in Rio in 2916. This summer’s Paralympics in Tokyo will be his forth and final Paralympic Games. Josh has a BA in history and a Masters Degree in business administration. Josh is currently an ATP certified Specialty Account Manager for Numotion in Omaha Nebraska. As well as a volunteer Director for the Ryan Martin Foundation which provides free adaptive sports camps for disabled children.